How to Trade Binary Options

How to Trade Binary Options General Risk Warning: The financial products offered by the company carry a high level of risk and can result in the loss of all your funds. You should never invest money that you cannot afford to lose. Binary options – the world’s financial instrument. They allow traders to  from price movements across all the world’s markets. There are only 2 types of transactions you can make with binary options: CALL and PUT. The IQ Option…

Read More

America’s ‘Fake’ Stability & Boobs On Credit

Authored by Jim Quinn via The Burning Platform blog,
Do you ever hear something so startlingly mind numbingly ridiculous you realize it must be a sign things have gotten so fucked up something has got to give?
As I was driving to work yesterday morning…

The post America’s ‘Fake’ Stability & Boobs On Credit appeared first on crude-oil.news.

The post America’s ‘Fake’ Stability & Boobs On Credit appeared first on aroundworld24.com.

The post America’s ‘Fake’ Stability & Boobs On Credit appeared first on forex-enligne-fr.com.

Read More

Gibraltar’s Financial Regulator Takes Note of ICO Boom, Issues Warning

Worldwide, regulators are concerned that investors might need to be protected from themselves, consider new regulatory frameworks or outright ICO bans

The post Gibraltar’s Financial Regulator Takes Note of ICO Boom, Issues Warning appeared first on bitcoinmining.shop.

The post Gibraltar’s Financial Regulator Takes Note of ICO Boom, Issues Warning appeared first on fastforexprofit.com, الفوركس بالنسبة لك.

Read More

Elon Musk Isn’t Alone: Vladimir Putin Asks “How Long Before The Robots Eat Us”

Elon Musk isn’t the only one whose afraid that advances in artificial intelligence will leads to something akin to the creation of Skynet.

The Daily Mail is reporting that Russian President Vladimir Putin has expressed reservations about artificial intelligence, even asking the head of Russia’s largest tech firm ‘how long do we have before the robots eat us’?

The Russian president was speaking to Arkady Volozh, chief of internet firm Yandex, during a tour of the company’s Moscow headquarters, the Daily Mail reports. Volozh was discussing the “potential” of AI when he discovered that Putin has a dramatically different interpretation of what that might be.

According to state-funded Russian broadcaster RT, the question baffled Volozh.  

“I hope never”, he replied after taking a pause to gather his thoughts. “It’s not the first machine to be better than humans at something. An excavator digs better than we do with a shovel. But we don’t get eaten by excavators. A car moves faster than we do…”

 

But Putin seemed unconvinced. “They don’t think,” he remarked.

 

Volozh acknowledged that it was true and scrambled back to his speech on AI’s merits.

Putin hasn’t always harbored such a pessimistic view of AI. When asked earlier this month by a group of kids about who would rule the world in the future, Putin said it would be whatever country manages to perfect artificial intelligence.

As RT points out, tech firms like Google and Facebook are developing new AI technology as an increasing number of online services rely on algorithms, including search engines, automated translation between languages, image enhancement and targeted advertising, an area that recently got Facebook into hot water when its self-reporting ad algos created a targeting category using the keywords “jew hater.”

Musk has repeatedly warned that AI could cause World War III. Unless the technology is properly regulated, he said, it represents a much bigger threat to the security of the US than North Korea.

Of course, Musk has been criticized for his paranoid views by such tech luminaries as Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who said he was “optimistic” about AI’s potential.

Whatever happens with AI, hopefully it doesn’t come to this.

 

The post Elon Musk Isn’t Alone: Vladimir Putin Asks “How Long Before The Robots Eat Us” appeared first on crude-oil.news.

The post Elon Musk Isn’t Alone: Vladimir Putin Asks “How Long Before The Robots Eat Us” appeared first on aroundworld24.com.

The post Elon Musk Isn’t Alone: Vladimir Putin Asks “How Long Before The Robots Eat Us” appeared first on forex-enligne-fr.com.

Read More

Is Blockchain Technology Really the Answer to Decentralized Storage?

While the Blockchain is certainly changing the world, it’s not a jack-of-all-trades. Have you heard of “chain washing?”

The post Is Blockchain Technology Really the Answer to Decentralized Storage? appeared first on bitcoinmining.shop.

The post Is Blockchain Technology Really the Answer to Decentralized Storage? appeared first on fastforexprofit.com, الفوركس بالنسبة لك.

Read More

The Sermon On The Mount[ain Of Debt]

Via Global Macro Monitor,
“Blessed are the young, for they shall inherit the national debt.” – President Herbert Hoover

The Hoover administration thought there was no room and was ideologically opposed to fiscal expansion to stimulat…

The post The Sermon On The Mount[ain Of Debt] appeared first on crude-oil.news.

The post The Sermon On The Mount[ain Of Debt] appeared first on aroundworld24.com.

The post The Sermon On The Mount[ain Of Debt] appeared first on forex-enligne-fr.com.

Read More

Expert on Blockchain-backed firms David Drake Joins DOVU Advisory Board

DOVU, the blockchain marketplace for transport data, is announcing the addition of a new and highly experienced advisor to their team. David Drake, Chairman at LDJ Capital, will provide counsel on critical issues including investor relations and international business development. ‘Unprecedented insight’ David Drake is a well-known entrepreneur, investor, and speaker. Through his family office, … Continue reading Expert on Blockchain-backed firms David Drake Joins DOVU Advisory Board

The post Expert on Blockchain-backed firms David Drake Joins DOVU Advisory Board appeared first on NEWSBTC.

The post Expert on Blockchain-backed firms David Drake Joins DOVU Advisory Board appeared first on bitcoinmining.shop.

The post Expert on Blockchain-backed firms David Drake Joins DOVU Advisory Board appeared first on Forex news – Binary options.

The post Expert on Blockchain-backed firms David Drake Joins DOVU Advisory Board appeared first on fastforexprofit.com, الفوركس بالنسبة لك.

Read More

“Japan Has No Illusions That Rates Will Ever Rise”: Is This What The Endgame Looks Like

By Victor Shvets of Macquarie Capital

Japan Debt Mountain: does it matter?

For almost 25 years, Japan’s debt burden has been the poster child of what would happen to others if capital is misallocated, bubbles burst and then clearance and required reforms are either delayed or not implemented. Indeed, at more than 5x GDP, Japan is shouldering a greater debt burden than other key jurisdictions. It is also facing severe demographic challenges, while its labour market remains constrained and the state maintains a sway over the private sector. Since WW II, Japan has always been more statist than most other major economies, with Korea and China subsequently following Japan in developing a similar model. The conventional argument has been that Japan’s debt would ultimately crush its economy and severely crimp public sector spending, while the private sector would be unable to adjust, and hence lose competitiveness. Eventually, the private sector might lose confidence and stop repatriating cash and the country would then suffer from massive capital outflows.

Not only were these dire projections wrong for decades, but as the rest of the world joined Japan in secular stagnation and unorthodox monetary policies, it is no longer perceived as an exception but rather as a pointer to the future. Japan’s success in navigating disruption, deep financialization and permanent overcapacity is now studied and imitated. While there are local nuances, Japan shows the way forward. QEs associated with the Fed were invented in Japan more than a decade earlier. The same applies to fiscal stimuli, collapsing velocity of money and strong disinflation. Whatever are the policies, Japan has already tried them. Japan is far more advanced in fully monetizing its debt by utilizing multiple asset classes, from bonds to equities. It also accepts that normalization is not feasible, and unlike the Fed, it has no illusions that rates could ever rise or that immigration and deep labour market reforms are either possible or desirable. When the US is focusing on returning outdated factories, Japan is building for the future, when labour inputs would no longer be the key.

Although Japan’s cultural and labour market constraints reduce its ability to fully commercialize inventions, it has not prevented the country from maintaining its rating as the most complex economy in the world, while keeping leadership in patents and yielding above-average labour and multi-factor productivity. Japan’s stagnant domestic economy is overshadowed by its competitive externally-facing sectors that are becoming complementary rather than directly competing against China. Even financial repression that Japan practised for decades is becoming a global norm, nowhere more so than in Eurozone. We expect BoJ to quietly abandon its inflation targets while maintaining flexibility in asset acquisitions to keep cost of finance close to zero. This would be a recipe for continuing twilight for years to come, with debt burden neither derailing the economy nor financial markets, even as BoJ assets rise beyond 100% of GDP (~45%+ of JGBs).

Assuming that Abenomics is dead and that there is neither desire nor capacity to lift inflationary outcomes, then it would be positive for ¥. Higher ¥ would erode Topix’s ROEs (corporate governance is unlikely to offset lower returns) but it should also highlight the strength of its globally competitive and thematic plays. In our global portfolios we currently have Yaskawa, Fanuc, Mitsubishi Electric, Nintendo, Nidec, Murata, Keyence, Tokyo Electron and Yamaha. Any further ¥ appreciation should also reduce pressure on Korea and China while extending EM reflationary cycle and its investment ‘goldilocks’.

Why is Debt Mountain not crushing Japan?

“We know that advanced economies with stable governments that borrow in their own currency are capable of running up very high levels of debt without crisis.”

       — Paul Krugman

This quote by Paul Krugman neatly encapsulates the main reasons as to why Japan has not been crushed by ever-rising public sector debt. Japan is state with a high degree of credibility and it borrows almost exclusively in its own currency, with debt owned predominantly by its own citizens. Financial crisis is all about perception rather than reality.

However, one issue that Krugman has not emphasized but which is increasingly important is the ability of central banks (CBs) to support and distort the governments’ cost of funds. Given that the CBs are not economic agents, their bids and bond acquisitions are not designed to discover appropriate pricing levels, but rather to support governments’ objectives (usually to simulate economies by lowering cost of capital). In the past, such aggressive interventionist policies were unique and infrequent events (accompanying wars or other major dislocations), but over the last two decades, they have become an increasingly acceptable tool in the governments’ armoury. Japan has been leading from the front for more than two decades, followed by the rest of the world after GFC.

Thus, there are essentially four reasons as to why most bets against Japan failed on a consistent basis:

  1. Japan is a homogeneous society, with relatively egalitarian income and wealth distribution, and hence, pain has been shared fairly evenly, thus preserving economic and societal coherence.
  2. Japan maintained credibility by selectively boosting and adjusting national commitments to elderly and medical care while irregularly pushing up consumption tax. Although some of these measures were counter-productive on a longer-term basis, they have placated global markets.
  3. Japan borrows in its own currency and the bulk of JGB holders are Japanese residents (over 88%). This massively reduces the degree of external vulnerability.
  4. BoJ has been exceptionally aggressive in driving money supply up and cost of capital down. This aggressiveness coincided with the growing global disinflationary trend, which eroded bond yields and significantly reduced the proportion of the government spending that is spent financing interest commitments.

As can be seen below, despite massive rise in the governments’ gross and net debt burden, the proportion of state spending that is dedicated to servicing interest has declined significantly over the last decade and is now below 5% of total expenditure.

The extent to which BoJ has become the key to Japan’s perceived longer-term sustainability can be seen from the explosion of its balance sheet and how its asset base increased at a pace much faster than state requirements. BoJ has by now accumulated almost 45% of the entire JGB’s market (vs 10% only five years ago), and its balance sheet is rapidly closing on 100% of the country’s GDP (vs 37% G4 average). Also, BoJ is not just buying state paper but it has become actively involved in the corporate and ETF (equities) markets. BoJ already controls 75% of all of Japanese ETFs (although only 4% of overall equities) and as much as 15% of the Japanese corporate bonds.

The public sector over the last two decades did not really have an option but to become far more aggressive in transferring excess debt from private sector and onto government books. While this private sector de-leveraging was largely complete by 2005, the combination of GFC as well as subsequent earthquake (2011), continued to suppress private sector desire for more aggressive spending. Private sector sectoral savings even today remain at ~6% of GDP, whilst velocity of money is at best only stabilizing.

If public sector did not step in, the country would have undergone a massive and uncontrolled deflationary bust. Instead, Japan had simply kept its nominal demand intact, despite the private sector sustaining losses (real estate and equities) of equivalent to 100% of Japan’s GDP in ‘90/91 (or ~US$5 trillion). For perspective, consider that the GFC caused initial contraction of only around 1/3 of the US GDP. In other words, bursting of an asset bubble in the ‘90s Japan was at least three times more powerful than the GFC’s impact.

The net outcome of aggressive public sector policies offsetting sluggish and deleveraging private sectors was a ‘tranquil autumn’ of a civilized relative decline.

The Japanese economy is today a fraction of its importance several decades ago. Whereas in the late ‘80s, Japan was responsible for ~10% of global merchandise exports, its share is now below 3.8%. In the same period, Germany’s share eased from 10%-11% in ‘80s to around 8%, while the US’s share is down from 12% to ~9% and France’s share is down from 5% in the ‘80s to ~3%. The same occurred to Japan’s share of global GDP (whether on a nominal or PPP basis). The growth rates have compressed massively, but the country managed to maintain its overall aggregate demand and per capita income intact.

Japan emerged from this traumatic experience, as land of no inflation (indeed mild deflation for most of the time) and steady demand funded by the fiscal stimulus and resilient private sector productivity.

It has become a land where the central bank has been effectively cancelling national debt by acquiring more securities than the government needed to fund its deficits. While this poses many questions (such as ability of life and insurance companies to price their products, in the absence of a viable JGB market), it also implies that Japan is shifting closer to embracing far more extreme (but necessary) policies, such as minimum income guarantees and abandoning any further consumption taxes.

In the world where labour inputs are becoming increasingly less relevant and where robotics, automation, AI and social capital are likely to play an increasingly important role, even the traditional argument of a negative impact of demographics no longer dooms Japan to oblivion and collapse. It also implies that the conventional arguments in favour of large-scale increase in immigration is not only irrelevant but is likely to be faulty on both theoretical and practical grounds. It is likely that the current age of ‘declining return on humans and conventional capital’ will become far more pronounced over the next decade. It so happens that Japan is in the forefront of this evolution.

It is highly unlikely that Japan would ever accept large-scale immigration (whether it applies to high or low skill labour). It is equally unlikely that the Japanese themselves would ever prefer to work and live in foreign jurisdictions. At the same time, the pace of human replacement (whether it is waiters in the restaurants or nurses in hospitals) is accelerating in Japan at a far more robust pace than elsewhere. The unique nature of Japan is also translating into sustainably high levels of private sector productivity while containing income and wealth inequalities. Although Japan is today more unequal than it was in  late 1980s-early 1990s, it still remains one of the most egalitarian societies in the world.

While Japan is yet reluctant to accept the most radical of policies, it is far more advanced in fully monetizing its debt burden and unlike most other countries it no longer requires an ever accelerating pace of financialization (or addition of new debt-driven generations). The objective in Japan is to maintain per capita income rather than generating growth to accommodate a rising population and keeping society intact. The extent to which Japan would be able to achieve this objective would depend critically on Japanese corporates and its overall economy maintaining productivity gains.

* * *

In part 2 tomorrow: “Global lessons from Japan – the future is Red”

The post “Japan Has No Illusions That Rates Will Ever Rise”: Is This What The Endgame Looks Like appeared first on crude-oil.news.

The post “Japan Has No Illusions That Rates Will Ever Rise”: Is This What The Endgame Looks Like appeared first on aroundworld24.com.

The post “Japan Has No Illusions That Rates Will Ever Rise”: Is This What The Endgame Looks Like appeared first on forex-enligne-fr.com.

Read More

BioCoin Loyalty Program to Encourage Agri-Sector

Cryptocurrencies and their underlying technology are gradually turning ubiquitous in nature, thanks to their potential applications. While various mainstream technology […]

The post BioCoin Loyalty Program to Encourage Agri-Sector appeared first on Bitcoin Network, News, Charts, Guides & Analysis.

The post BioCoin Loyalty Program to Encourage Agri-Sector appeared first on bitcoinmining.shop.

The post BioCoin Loyalty Program to Encourage Agri-Sector appeared first on forex-4you.com, الفوركس بالنسبة لك.

Read More

Drone Footage Shows Puerto Rico Devastation From The Air

Hurricane Maria caused widespread damage to Puerto Rico. Drone footage captured the scene in San Juan and Canóvanas on Sept. 21.

As we reported earlier, flash flooding caused by the storm has prompted the NWS to warn that a dam in the northwestern part of the island is in danger of failing, prompting the government to scramble to evacuate the 70,000 residents of the river valley beneath the dam that is in danger of being completely submerged.

The post Drone Footage Shows Puerto Rico Devastation From The Air appeared first on crude-oil.news.

The post Drone Footage Shows Puerto Rico Devastation From The Air appeared first on aroundworld24.com.

The post Drone Footage Shows Puerto Rico Devastation From The Air appeared first on forex-enligne-fr.com.

Read More